3 months, 3 races

A compendium post-TuM  update:

I was ready to get stuck into some hard training following my disappointment at TuM 2016. However, I ended up being laid low, not with a running injury but with a pneumothorax. A weekend in hospital and a chest drain sorted me out, and once I had recovered I got back into the miles. It’s been great having 8 weeks in a row of 60-70k, and no calf injury for nearly a year. I can feel my body responding better to training and taking less time to recover which is encouraging.

First race back was the Tawharanui Coastal Challenge in early April.

There was a last minute course change, which saw the 30k become just an out and back addition to the 23k. That, and the extra sleep made the 23k the attractive option and I joined Laura, Dave, Sean and Brent who made up our MEC crew. The other difference from last year was the tide was out. Like nearly all the way – hence the times we ran were way faster, not having to scramble on the loose rocks at the high tide line so much.

Not fast. Fun.It was an MEC lead-out at the start on Campbell’s Bay. I was running just behind Brent and Sean who set a strong pace. They had an edge on me on the rocks, but I maintained contact as best I could. Then on the beach sections I would regain the distance. This lasted to about 35 minutes in, where I caught them and then Brent dropped back, looking a bit ill. So it became Sean and I duking it out, with Brent maintaining contact until we left the rocks at Tawharanui and climbed up to the point. I had a bit of catching up to do here, but felt strong and caught Sean at the Trig. I decided to keep the intensity up as we went back downhill and opened up a gap. But it wasn’t a big one. Sean upped his speed too and kept me close as we sped down to Anchor Bay and the second to last aid station.

I kept the pressure on for the beach section – knowing that there was a 3k reef to traverse before the end I had to make the most of my strengths. I got away to about 200m ahead as I entered the Northern Tawharanui reef. I made myself keep at it, but the occasional check back revealed Sean closing in.

I hit the base of Omaha beach – 1 Mile of flat sand to the finish. Sean was only 80m back and I turned on the boosters. I got a bit of a break, and then just clung on to the finish. I was stoked with the win, and elated at having a good battle with a bro – Sean was relentless (I just wanted to him to fold!). So we had an MEC 1-2 in the men’s race. Brent came in for 5th, Laura showed her 3rd at the North Shore Coastal was no fluke, running away with the women’s 23k and Dave came in shortly afterwards. Green singlet domination!

Next race was the Orewa Beach 10k

Orewa halfThis one fell apart. Initial interest was high, but for one reason or another I was the only MEC starter. It was a howling ESE wind with rain ripping up the beach. I neglected to take the conditions into consideration and ran my ‘perfect day’ race plan. I still got 2nd place, but it was with a huge second half slow down, so the execution felt rather poor. Kudos to Brent who braved the conditions to cheer me on – it definitely lifted me. I thought the course would suit a PB, but I’d recommend looking elsewhere – although the start and finish are on the beach, the course has lots of sharp turns and two decent hills which slow you down. And being an out and back – there was huge congestion on the bush track which slowed you as well.

The bonus race was the Waiheke Half Marathon

2158125_origRon and I got some tickets to this and our solid workouts in the weeks leading up gave me two thoughts: 1 – we were going to be very evenly matched and 2 – we were in good form and could be contending with the front runners (especially since the Rotorua marathon 1 week earlier had taken out some of the likely competition).

It was a gorgeous day on the island. We positioned ourselves at the front for the start and enjoyed the downhill spin to Matiatia wharf. On the climb back up we dropped a few of the pretenders leaving us in a group of 4. On the next big downhill to Owhanake we let the legs spin and pulled away. Trail running descending pays dividends in road racing!

It felt like a good pace – manageable but obviously quick. Coming back up from Oneroa beach we were being hounded by a silver fox. We just stuck with the game plan. He caught us around 6k, but once again we would drop him on every downhill, making him work hard to catch us again on the flat. The course is a rollercoaster (300m gain/descent) and this approach worked well. By 8k he had fallen off the group.

So Ron and I sped along, enjoying the amazingly scenic course, steadily pulling away. Te course is not a find-your-pace-and-stick-at-it kind of course. At times we would be in the low 3min/ks downhill then we would be grunting up a climb at close to 4:40 pace. It was well marked and well marshalled- a great effort for a first time event. The only error I saw was the out and back onto Kennedy Point, the marshals helped you cross the road, but evidently didn’t point people left as we came across a bunch of guys who had bypassed this section and were turned back by the lead scooter.

20x30-WHMC1292
The King of Waiheke

This was at the 16k point. It was getting hard now, but I knew I had to maintain contact with Ron to remain competitive. So I gritted my teeth and hung on. It was really nice getting all the encouragement from the 21k runners still heading out on the other side of the road. The cheering intensified as we came back into the 10k runners at Blackpool. I was feeling the pace but got such a lift that we sped up! We were at about 3:45 pace winding through the streets, 1.5k to go. The last challenge would be the 40 metre climb in the last kilometre. We hit the climb and my ability to stay with Ron was eclipsed. He launched into it and I could not match his pace. He crossed in 1:23:18, me 12 seconds back. Another MEC 1-2!

The experience of digging deep, and of running strong the whole way made this my best half marathon performance to date. On a flatter course, it would have been a PB for sure. It was a real thrill having such a great battle, and drawing out of yourself something extra to meet the challenge. I am looking forward to the rematch!20x30-WHMC1315

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “3 months, 3 races

  1. Great write up again Mike. I would describe your late summer coastal trifecta as quite the success. It must be very encouraging to see that continual improvement from your consistent work.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s